Thursday, December 14th, 2017

Posted by Erica McGillivray
Holy cannoli, it's MozCon 2013 Agenda time! July 8th-July 10th here in Seattle are going to be out-of-this-world.

I know many of you have been asking for the complete MozCon schedule, and we've been working hard w…

Posted by Erica McGillivray
Last year at MozCon, we tried something new: community speakers. The feedback we receieved from those of you who attended was phenomal, and our four speakers were spectacular.

So this year, we're opening up four commu…

Posted by Erica McGillivray

Anyone who's seen Wil Reynolds from SEER Interactive give a presentation remembers him. The first time I saw him speak, at SearchFest in 2012, I found myself not just nodding along with what he was saying while checking Twitter — but actually listening. I was actually thinking about what I was doing as an inbound marketer and how I could make it better.

So when I sat down to interview Wil, I wanted to know more about his inspirations and his belief in the power of YouTube. And of course, Real Company Shit Stuff (#RCS).

Wil Reynolds at MozCon 2012

Wil at MozCon 2012. Photo by Rudy Lopez Photography.

What's inspired you lately?

I was most inspired by Lani Lazzari, the 18-year-old who went on the TV show Shark Tank and just killed it. (Fast forward to 22 mins to see her.) It was inspiring to think at that age she had the confidence, poise, ownership of the stage in a way that most people never gain in their entire professional lives. Younger people who do this tend to inspire me.

I don’t throw around the word 'inspiration' often; it's something I don’t say lightly.

I have also recently been reflecting on great client service, and I have been thinking a lot about how to create experiences for our clients that are above and beyond expectations. What got me inspired by that? A recent stay at a 5-star hotel. The attention to detail and the care about me enjoying myself were more than I’ve experienced anywhere.

When you first started pondering #RCS, what kind of hope did you have for the widespread adoption you've seen?

I had no hope. (It's why I didn’t register the domain or anything!) I just started thinking, 'Is my job going to be having a less crappy list of link networks? Do I get excited about sending emails as a female persona because the open rate is higher? NO way!'

My hope for #RCS is the same it's been for every other presentation I’ve ever given. Give people one to two things that will stick with them WELL PAST the day or two after the conference. I want to find the simple things people can do or the mind shift we need to make to make real changes and real successes.

Watch Wil's talk from last year's MozCon on #RCS.

 

 

As you've implemented #RCS for SEER and your clients, what's a favorite 'ah ha' moment you've had or seen?

The client response. It's amazing how every so often a lead comes in saying, 'We are looking to do #RCS.' That is always kind of exciting as it means the client and SEER are aligned on what success looks like.

Getting two clients on TV, from an SEO company idea, is hands down one of my proudest moments. I’m glad to have clients who believe and a team who believes that an SEO company is just as able to develop quality marketing ideas as a marketing agency.

I also realize that #RCS should have never had to have been said… If I was at a marketing, branding, or PR conference, it would have been a dud. As that is what they have been practicing all along.

What's #RCS' biggest nemesis?

Google.

If #RCS doesn’t drive rankings, then many SEOs will continue to seek to find shortcuts. If the rewards for their hard work of convincing a client; building quality assets; and promoting it to real news outlets, publications, and bloggers will not get ranking love, that is a major smack in the face.

You also advocate for marketers to help each other to build their careers. What are some of your favorite channels to help others on?

YouTube. Google+ Hangouts. It's funny; right now, there is a massive debate on women at conferences. But, I have yet to see someone say, 'Hey, I’ll be on Google+ doing a hangout to help any of these guys (or gals) get better.' I absolutely love the power of YouTube to help others, even in my sleep. :)

As a company founder, I see a large part of my job being to understand what my team is seeking in their careers. And as long as they are kicking butt for clients, how can I invest my time and network to help them get on that path or get that exposure. I think that is the start.

Wil Reynolds' photo from WaslalaWhile we're on the topic of giving back, you've spent some time lately unplugged and in Nicaragua to work for your wife Nora's nonprofit. Tell us a bit about it.

My wife Nora co-founded an organization, Water for Waslala, to help people in very rural Nicaragua get access to clean drinking water. It's funny how, in parts of Waslala, I can get a cell phone signal, but I can’t get clean drinking water. That was eye opening as it was a reminder that there is no money in clean water, and as such, it's not as big of a priority, sadly.

I have been twice, and the trip usually results in several bruises since it is like eight hours travel in the back of a truck. After being there though, it's always all worth it.

I am most concerned with what [my unplugging and traveling to Waslala] says to Nora; I want her to know that me being off the grid never happens, but I place supporting her efforts as highly as she prioritizes supporting mine. I guess it is what makes us work.

Awww. Thanks, Wil, for ending this interview on an awesome note.

For more thoughts on #RCS, Wil will be speaking again at this year's MozCon, July 8th-10th. He'll be giving everyone an update on how #RCS been going and his tips for implementing it in your business. You can also follow Wil at @wilreynolds.

Sign up for The Moz Top 10, a semimonthly mailer updating you on the top ten hottest pieces of SEO news, tips, and rad links uncovered by the Moz team. Think of it as your exclusive digest of stuff you don’t have time to hunt down but want to read!

Posted by Erica McGillivray
I sat down to talk with Adriel Sanchez, Sr. Director of Demand Generation at SAP. Every day, he digs into how he can help B2B businesses and their marketers with database marketing, telemarketing, digital marketing, and cam…

Posted by Erica McGillivray
I sat down to talk with Adriel Sanchez, Sr. Director of Demand Generation at SAP. Every day, he digs into how he can help B2B businesses and their marketers with database marketing, telemarketing, digital marketing, and cam…

Posted by Erica McGillivray

You may have heard the rumor that MozCon 2013 tickets are on sale! I'm pleased to announce that this year's MozCon Command Crew is busy planning the best MozCon yet.

Launch your inbound marketing skills into outer space by attending this year's MozCon, July 8th-10th at the WA State Convention Center! This year, we have 400 early bird tickets, which are flying out the door faster than you can say "Roger Mozbot." Snag yours now!

Early Bird $999 $799 for SEOmoz PRO members
Early Bird $1499 $1299 for SEOmoz non-PRO members

Bonus! This year your ticket price includes MozCon 2013 videos.

For three days, we bring you amazing, future-thinking content from industry leaders, deep diving into SEO, social media, marketing analytics, content strategy, data science, and so much more. See who's coming to speak and share their expertise with you. You're sure to come back home with a universe's worth of actionable knowledge to start implementing. Get a sample of MozCon caliber speakers by watching Wil Reynolds' talk on #RCS from MozCon 2012

Jenny Lam at MozCon 2012

You'll rub elbows with the brightest minds in the industry. (Hint: you're one of them!) Whether you're posing with Roger for photos; eating bacon while chatting with a speaker; meeting other community members from all over the world; or chilling with the Mozzers who make the magic happen, you'll have an out-of-the-world time.

For those of you who've attended MozCons in the past, you might've noticed that we've changed venue to the WA State Convention Center in downtown Seattle. That's right — we outgrew our last venue with 850 attendees in 2012. We're expecting up to 1,200 community members, plus around 150 Mozzers and various crew, for MozCon 2013!

Yes, we're already working with our new venue to get Wi-Fi that actually works. Leave your MiFis at home!

How likely are you to recommend MozCon? Very likely.

We only expect MozCon to become even more amazing!

For 2013, we've secured MozCon attendees deals in two fabulous hotels within blocks of the WA State Convention Center.

Hotels:

Grand Hyatt Seattle
721 Pine Street
Seattle, Washington 98101

Hyatt at Olive 8
1635 8th Avenue
Seattle, Washington 98101

Hotels come with complimentary wifi, and for those of you driving in, we've gotten parking deals to save you some money.

Book Your Hotel Now

You'll be able to easily walk from your hotel to MozCon and back again in this relatively safe neighborhood. Not to mention, there's tons of food and shopping, and it's also within walking distance of the MozPlex and Pike Place Market. (Stay tuned for more information about office tours.) Plus, everything's right by Seattle's light rail, which gives you easy access to and from the airport. No need for a rental car or an expensive taxi!

Mozzers love Roger!

If you aren't already dreaming of Seattle, browse Rand's killer list of restaurants and bars and even more restaurant, sightseeing, and shopping recommendations. Did you know there's a cupcake shop across the street from the MozPlex? And pay attention to the 15 things you should know about Seattle. We've got a haunted underground, the weird park featured in 10 Things I Hate About You, a Dalek inside a Frank Garrity building, and 1,030,000 search results for "hipster bar Seattle."

Our community rocks. We can't wait to meet you face-to-face. See you in July!

Rand points the way to MozCon

Buy Your Ticket!

Sign up for The Moz Top 10, a semimonthly mailer updating you on the top ten hottest pieces of SEO news, tips, and rad links uncovered by the Moz team. Think of it as your exclusive digest of stuff you don’t have time to hunt down but want to read!

Posted by Erica McGillivray

You may have heard the rumor that MozCon 2013 tickets are on sale! I'm pleased to announce that this year's MozCon Command Crew is busy planning the best MozCon yet.

Launch your inbound marketing skills into outer space by attending this year's MozCon, July 8th-10th at the WA State Convention Center! This year, we have 400 early bird tickets, which are flying out the door faster than you can say "Roger Mozbot." Snag yours now!

Early Bird $999 $799 for SEOmoz PRO members
Early Bird $1499 $1299 for SEOmoz non-PRO members

Bonus! This year your ticket price includes MozCon 2013 videos.

For three days, we bring you amazing, future-thinking content from industry leaders, deep diving into SEO, social media, marketing analytics, content strategy, data science, and so much more. See who's coming to speak and share their expertise with you. You're sure to come back home with a universe's worth of actionable knowledge to start implementing. Get a sample of MozCon caliber speakers by watching Wil Reynolds' talk on #RCS from MozCon 2012

Jenny Lam at MozCon 2012

You'll rub elbows with the brightest minds in the industry. (Hint: you're one of them!) Whether you're posing with Roger for photos; eating bacon while chatting with a speaker; meeting other community members from all over the world; or chilling with the Mozzers who make the magic happen, you'll have an out-of-the-world time.

For those of you who've attended MozCons in the past, you might've noticed that we've changed venue to the WA State Convention Center in downtown Seattle. That's right — we outgrew our last venue with 850 attendees in 2012. We're expecting up to 1,200 community members, plus around 150 Mozzers and various crew, for MozCon 2013!

Yes, we're already working with our new venue to get Wi-Fi that actually works. Leave your MiFis at home!

How likely are you to recommend MozCon? Very likely.

We only expect MozCon to become even more amazing!

For 2013, we've secured MozCon attendees deals in two fabulous hotels within blocks of the WA State Convention Center.

Hotels:

Grand Hyatt Seattle
721 Pine Street
Seattle, Washington 98101

Hyatt at Olive 8
1635 8th Avenue
Seattle, Washington 98101

Hotels come with complimentary wifi, and for those of you driving in, we've gotten parking deals to save you some money.

Book Your Hotel Now

You'll be able to easily walk from your hotel to MozCon and back again in this relatively safe neighborhood. Not to mention, there's tons of food and shopping, and it's also within walking distance of the MozPlex and Pike Place Market. (Stay tuned for more information about office tours.) Plus, everything's right by Seattle's light rail, which gives you easy access to and from the airport. No need for a rental car or an expensive taxi!

Mozzers love Roger!

If you aren't already dreaming of Seattle, browse Rand's killer list of restaurants and bars and even more restaurant, sightseeing, and shopping recommendations. Did you know there's a cupcake shop across the street from the MozPlex? And pay attention to the 15 things you should know about Seattle. We've got a haunted underground, the weird park featured in 10 Things I Hate About You, a Dalek inside a Frank Garrity building, and 1,030,000 search results for "hipster bar Seattle."

Our community rocks. We can't wait to meet you face-to-face. See you in July!

Rand points the way to MozCon

Buy Your Ticket!

Sign up for The Moz Top 10, a semimonthly mailer updating you on the top ten hottest pieces of SEO news, tips, and rad links uncovered by the Moz team. Think of it as your exclusive digest of stuff you don’t have time to hunt down but want to read!

Posted by Erica McGillivray

Top secret: editing your own writing is the worst part of writing. We all hate it, whether we label ourselves writers, SEOs, Doctor Who fans, and/or magical princesses. Stepping back from your own writing to give it polish is hard. Typos, badly constructed paragraphs, awkward phrases, or just general poor writing jump out when someone else writes it. But moi? I would never do that. And neither would you.

However, reality is that today no matter our titles, most of us are required to write, and we need editing help. I hope you'll be able to find some tips to help you in what can sometimes be an arduous process. But maybe you'll find a little love, a little magic, and transform your writing into something beautiful.

P.S. Advanced grammar students: go forth with the diagramming of sentences.

"I really do not know that anything has ever been more exciting than diagramming sentences." — Gertrude Stein
 

Video Transcription

"Howdy SEOmoz fans. It's Whiteboard Friday. I'm Erica, and I'm the Community Attachè here at SEOmoz. Today we're going to talk about copy editing and things you can do to make yourself look more professional.

I realize many of you, we started out as SEOs. A couple of years ago, in the industry, it was like keyword research. Where am I ranking? The most copy you ever wrote was like a meta description, maybe a product description.

But today, the world of SEO, as we know, is drastically changing. We're doing all sorts of copywriting these days. Content marketing is huge. You've got guest blogging. We're all over, and a lot of you are really frustrated because you're like, "Man, I wish my writing was better. I wish I had a writer on my staff to help me out." But sometimes you are that person who is doing a little bit of everything. I've totally been there.

So today we're just going to talk about how to make your copy editing magical and make you look a little more professional. People will be like, "Wow, I knew you were an amazing SEO. I didn't know what a great writer you were too."

So these are some little handy-dandy tricks I try to remember any time I am writing.

So the first thing you want to do is you want to identify your why. Why are you writing this piece? What are you trying to accomplish by going out there and talking about it? Like when I sat down to outline my Whiteboard Friday, I said, "I have this knowledge about copy editing. I want to share it with SEOmoz's audience because I know you'll find it valuable, especially if you're going to write a YouMoz or something.

So if you can focus really on your piece and figure out that why it is so important with you, that's really going to make sure that your piece, that your writing comes together. If you're writing about kittens or unicorns or if you're writing a serious piece about using Google Analytics, importing into Excel, and doing all the crazy, amazing SEO things I know all of you know how to do.

So the second thing that you want to focus on is finding your voice. Every writer writes a little bit differently, just as every person is a little different. As you continue to write and continue to practice, there will be certain words you use. There will be certain ways you phrase things that really identify who you are.

One of the funnest things I like to play with is using styles or voices from other people. So, for instance, I've totally written a blog post as Rand, and it was kind of funny. Can I sound like Rand? Where can I go? Or I used to – and now Ashley our content specialist has taken this over – write the SEOmoz newsletter. One time I wrote as Roger, but as Captain Kirk doing a little captain's log. So you can have a lot of fun with your voice and your style. Don't be afraid to be a little kooky. Give it a little personality. Show who you are. Show what you're interested in.

The third tip, which is going more, once you've written your piece, you're kind of pulling back into the finer editing stage. Read your work aloud. Just do it. Sit there and go slowly. If you have to print it out, do it old school, and just read every word you've written.

When I was a kid, I had this problem where I would always skip over the little words like the, a and. My teachers would just paper full of red. Like what happened? I finally broke that habit when I went to college, and I started printing out my essays and reading them slowly aloud. I'm sure my dorm mate was like super thrilled to hear my essays about ancient Celtic languages, for instance.

But it will so much improve your writing, because you'll notice things. You'll read it and you'll like, "Wow, this doesn't make any sense. What was I even thinking?"

It helps with some of those more embarrassing typos or confusion if your sentences are getting really long and complicated, especially as you're diving into more advanced topics.

So my fourth tip is put your writing aside. I'm sure many of you have suffered from writer's block or just frustrations when you get to the editing part. You just don't want to let it go. Writers often call this killing your babies, which is kind of vulgar maybe. But we get really attached to what we've written, and we can't always see how to edit it and how to bring it back in and really refine our piece.

Maybe you start a draft and you set it aside and maybe you come back to it tomorrow. Maybe you come back to it six months to a year from now. You never know when it's . . . if it's something you love and it's something you're passionate about, maybe you can't push it. But sometimes maybe it's just that 24 hours, because I realize a lot of you are also out there writing things that are super time sensitive that you have to get out right away, which brings me to the next point.

Ask a friend to edit. If you're doing something really time sensitive, this is extremely helpful. If your friend has any editing experience, it's even better. You never know what crazy typos you're going to send out into the world or what crazy communication flubs, or maybe your piece just needed like five paragraphs cut out of it. Having someone you trust and someone who you can respect their opinion goes even further.

You definitely don't want to do things like I've done where I was sending out an email about fly fishing clothing and in the subject line I put,
"Flying fishing clothing sale today" or something like that. It just really helps you from making that mistake and then going, "Oh, what did I do? Oh no."

Friends can also be great at telling you what's good about your writing and encouraging, bringing those themes out. I just wrote an essay about Dr. Who. My editor came back to me, and she was like, "You know, you've been doing too much recapping. Cut this, cut this, cut this." I was kind of sitting there like, oh my gosh, wilting flower. I don't want to kill my babies. But what my editor was great about was she said, "You know, I really love what you're doing here and here and here. Let's bring that out." So at the end of the day, I had to do a super bunch of editing, but it helped me to know what the best things were out of that piece too. So criticism is both a negative and a positive.

Getting a little more into the technical, a lot of you out there are like, "How can I be better with my grammar?" I get a lot of questions from people at SEOmoz about grammar things, like, "Should I put a comma here? What the hay. Where do I go? How can I improve my grammar stuff?"

The first thing, which I suggest, is looking at what's called active versus passive voice. Active means exactly what you all know the word means. Active means that you're out and about. Your language is springy versus passive it's just kind of in the corner. It's like the wallflower at the party. You don't really care.

So, for instance, if you had the sentence, "The dog was jumping on the bed." You're dog is bad. Your dog is jumping on your bed. But it's just kind of boring. If you're like, "The dog jumps on the bed," it's much more active. It tells you what the dog is doing. It brings that sentence to life. Often it's just a simple switch of moving what you're talking about at the end to the beginning.

You can look up more about active versus passive voice online. It's known to be verbs are passive.

The next thing you want to do is look at your sentence lengths. You want to vary them. A lot of people get really long winded when they're writing because they're trying to cram everything in. You get these super long sentences that are all the way to the ground. If you just step back and look and be like, "Oh, I can put periods here. I can shorten it." You can have a short sentence and a long sentence. It's a littlie advanced, but it will make your writing much more snappy and sound like people actually converse.

For those of you who are really, really advanced in your grammar, here's my last tip. Learn to diagram sentences. I'm sure my 7th and 8th grade English teachers are very happy that I'm recommending this to you. But if you really want to know grammar and if you really struggle with it, learn how to diagram sentences so you can identify the subject of your sentence, the verb of your sentence the object, and any sort of clauses or anything. Then you can figure out, if people come to you and say like, "You always have run-on sentences, you always have incomplete sentences," these are the type of things that if you can identify the parts of the sentence, you can say,
"Oh, I know exactly why this sentence isn't working. Or I know why it's not communicating clearly to my audience." But that's just your advanced homework.

So I hope that all of you will learn these magical tips and transform your writing. You can now go from just an ordinary SEO to something more magical."

Video transcription by Speechpad.com

Sign up for The Moz Top 10, a semimonthly mailer updating you on the top ten hottest pieces of SEO news, tips, and rad links uncovered by the Moz team. Think of it as your exclusive digest of stuff you don’t have time to hunt down but want to read!